Your students have done it.
All their universities have replied, and they’ve made the most dramatic decision of their academic life. It’s finally over, and the students are ready to step foot into a new and exciting phase – college.
(If you’ve been using Cialfo’s application management platform to track your students’ applications, your ‘status tracker’ would turn to a pleasing colour of green for every successful application.)
But wait, it’s spring, and college doesn’t start until after summer break. How are they going to prepare themselves for their new college life? The job of a consultant doesn’t end once they’ve been accepted into college. 
Here’s a few things you could recommend your students to do over the summer, before the start of their semester.

Finish strong!

Your students might’ve been accepted into college, but chances are they have a couple months left of high school. It’s rumored that the infamous “Senioritis” bug has swept across your class.
Some of your students have friends struggling to make it to class or hand in important final assignments.
Instead of giving in to complacency, encourage your student to make a commitment by finishing their final year strong. Remind them that some acceptance offers are conditional! If the student has hit an achievement, or performed exceptionally, have them inform their college as well. Colleges will be more than happy to hear that their incoming students are as committed as ever.

Research, stay informed!

If the student has paid their college deposit, it’s easy for them to take a backseat and relax. After all, they’ll feel like they’ve earned themselves a well-deserved reprieve! Not quite yet; one can never over-prepare for college.
If the student is taking a vacation, remind them to stay informed with the latest news and updates from their college’s admissions office. Colleges will be sending students tons of important material like roommate request forms, health forms, and insurance, so stay in the loop! These documents will determine important aspects of a student’s first year.

Make new friends!

Technology is wonderful, and social media is great. Colleges will likely have a Facebook page or
similar, for incoming students to meet online, engage in academic or social queries and requests! Encourage your students to engage with their classmates before meeting them.
Exchanging information, contacts, and interests beforehand can help for a much smoother transition for students making friends in and out of the classroom.

Go forth and conquer!

Maybe your student has a passion for marine biology, but lives in the city. Another student might love the great books, but grew up in a foreign country. The opportunities to explore and learn are endless.
Whether it’s interests, service, or passion that drives your student, there are endless opportunities to work and discover themselves and the world they live in. If something interests them, chances are there will be an opportunity awaiting. And if these opportunities don’t exist, encourage your student to go out and make one! In an age of startups and ideas, they are more equipped than ever to make things happen.

Keep perspective!

After your student has committed to their university, sit down with them and reflect. Think about all that they have accomplished so far, and where they want to go. What kind of student, and more
importantly, what kind of person do you want to be in college?
That could mean staying the course, or, it might call for a change of direction. Whatever the case, encourage them to think ahead. College life will inevitably pose numerous challenges to students.
Knowing what they want to accomplish, and keeping an open mind. That’s the balance.
Kristin Sullivan

Posted by Kristin Sullivan

Kristin has worked as a college counselor and director at a prestigious private college prep school in Arizona where she helped over 500 students find their path to meet their educational goals and dreams. Kristin focuses on getting to know her students and families to help them find their best university fit. Kristin has a BA in psychology from the University of Michigan and a Master’s degree in counseling from Michigan State University.

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